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Grundfos cuts CO2 while growing its business

The Grundfos Group does what many responsible companies only dream of: it is generating economic growth while reducing its environmental footprint. In addition, its employees are involved in providing clean drinking water for their fellow citizens around the world. These are parts of the messages in the Group's reporting on sustainability for 2013.

Back in 2008, Grundfos set a goal of never emitting more CO2 than it did that particular year, even though the company had comprehensive growth plans. This goal has been reached. Grundfos has managed to reduce its CO2emission by 20 per cent, while simultaneously increasing turnover by 22 per cent since 2008. In addition to this, the Group has been able to reduce its energy consumption by nine per cent during the same period. Also, the company's water usage has been strongly reduced by a total of 28 per cent since 2008.

"When we tell our customers, they should have sustainability and energy efficiency in mind out of consideration for their own finances and the global climate alike, our arguments have more impact if we lead the way and do it ourselves. Our promise from 2008 was extremely ambitious, but by using the latest technologies, for instance motors and pumps, and involving the employees, we have succeeded quite well," states Group Vice President of Quality and Sustainability, Pernille Blach Hansen.

Grundfos' pump solutions are used all over the world, among other things for providing access to clean drinking water. Also, Grundfos' employees are involved in this purpose, where they with their own funds have donated water systems in Kenya and Vietnam. The project is called Water2Life and has raised 180,000 Euro to secure access to clean drinking water for thousands of people.

Furthermore, employees from Grundfos companies in several countries have installed water saving aerators on taps in many of the factories, offices and in their own private homes as part of an internal campaign focusing on water savings.

In addition, the report shows that Grundfos has the ambition to reserve at least three per cent of its production workforce for people with special needs. That number has now reached four per cent. For 46 years, Grundfos has integrated physically and mentally handicapped people, socially exposed and others into the company.

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