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The Periodic Table of Endangered Elements

The European Chemical Society has released a revised version of the Periodic Table.

In this Periodic Table, the area of each element links to its number of atoms on a logarithmic scale. Based on current consumption levels, the color coding reveals whether there is enough of each chemical element or whether the element is becoming deficient.

Periodic table

While these elements don't technically run out but transform, some are being used up extremely quickly, where they may rapidly become exceptionally scarce.

One chemical element worth pointing out in the Periodic Table is carbon, which is three different colors: green, red, and dark gray.

Green, because carbon is in abundance as carbon dioxide

Red, because it will in the nearest future cause several considerable problems if consumption habits don't change

Gray because carbon-based fuels often come from conflict nations.

The carbon cycle balances photosynthesis, by which plants grow, taking up carbon dioxide, with respiration, by which we and all living organisms exist and give out CO2. For millennia, these two processes, compounded with CO2 absorption and release by the oceans, have been in balance, explaining the soft green color given to carbon in the Periodic Table.

Burning carbon-based fuels pump so much additional carbon dioxide into the atmosphere that photosynthesis and the oceans can't keep up. Hence, CO2 levels increase, leading to global warming and climate change that will cause severe disruption to all living beings on Earth if we do nothing.

Altering the color of carbon is a clarion call to everyone.

Element

Full Name

Status

Ac

Actinium

Plentiful supply

Ag

Silver

Serious threat

AI

Aluminum

Plentiful supply

Ar

Argon

Plentiful supply

As

Arsenic

Serious threat

At

Astatine

Plentiful supply

Au

Gold

Limited availability

B

Boron

Limited availability

Ba

Barium

Plentiful supply

Be

Beryllium

Plentiful supply

Bi

Bismuth

Limited availability

Br

Bromine

Plentiful supply

C

Carbon

Plentiful supply / serious threat

Ca

Calcium

Plentiful supply

Cd

Cadmium

Rising threat

Ce

Cerium

Plentiful supply

CI

Chlorine

Plentiful supply

Co

Cobalt

Rising threat

Cr

Chromium

Rising threat

Cs

Cesium

Plentiful supply

Cu

Copper

Rising threat

Dy

Dysprosium

Rising threat

Er

Erbium

Plentiful supply

Eu

Europium

Plentiful supply

F

Flourine

Plentiful supply

Fe

Iron

Plentiful supply

Fr

Francium

Plentiful supply

Ga

Gallium

Serious threat

Gd

Gadolinium

Plentiful supply

Ge

Germanium

Serious threat

H

Hydrogen

Plentiful supply

He

Helium

Serious threat

Hf

Hafnium

Serious threat

Hg

Mercury

Limited availability

Ho

Holmium

Plentiful supply

I

Iodine

Plentiful supply

In

Indium

Serious threat

Ir

Iridium

Rising threat

K

Potassium

Plentiful supply

Kr

Krypton

Plentiful supply

La

Lanthanum

Plentiful supply

Li

Lithium

Limited availability

Lu

Lutetium

Plentiful supply

Mg

Magnesium

Limited availability

Mn

Manganese

Limited availability

Mo

Molybdenum

Limited availability

N

Nitrogen

Plentiful supply

Na

Sodium

Plentiful supply

Nb

Niobium

Limited availability

Nd

Neodymium

Limited availability

Ne

Neon

Plentify supply

Ni

Nickel

Limited availability

O

Oxygen

Plentiful supply

Os

Osmium

Rising threat

P

Phosphorus

Limited availability

Pa

Protactinium

Plentiful supply

Pb

Lead

Limited availability

Pd

Palladium

Rising threat

Po

Polonium

Plentiful supply

Pr

Praseodymium

Plentiful supply

Pt

Platinum

Rising threat

Ra

Radium

Plentiful supply

Rb

Rubidium

Plentiful supply

Re

Rhenium

Plentiful supply

Rh

Rhodium

Rising threat

Rn

Radon

Plentify supply

Ru

Ruthenium

Rising threat

Sb

Antimony

Limited availability

Sc

Scandium

Limited availability

Se

Selenium

Limited availability

Si

Silicon

Plentiful supply

S

Sulfur

Plentiful supply

Sm

Samarium

Plentiful supply

Sn

Tin

Limited availability

Sr

Strontium

Serious threat

Ta

Tantalum

Serious threat

Tb

Terbium

Plentiful supply

Te

Tellurium

Serious threat

Ti

Titanium

Plentiful supply

TI

Thalium

Limited availability

Tm

Thulium

Plentiful supply

V

Vanadium

Limited availability

W

Tungsten

Limited availability

Xe

Xenon

Plentiful supply

Y

Yttrium

Serious threat

Yb

Ytterbium

Plentiful supply

Zn

Zinc

Serious threat

Zr

Zirconium

Limited availability

Th

Thorium

Plentiful supply

U

Uranium

Rising threat


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