Saturday, March 21, 2015

Kilauea - The Fire Within

This six and a half minute film is my best attempt at capturing what it felt like to witness molten rock slowly burning down a dense wet rainforest or to peer into a six-hundred-foot-wide lava lake at Kilauea's summit crater.

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Thursday, March 12, 2015

The Lost World

Hang Son Doong

Take an otherworldly journey through Hang Son Doong, the world's largest cave, by both ground and air.
 
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Wednesday, March 11, 2015

Internet Cafe Refugees in Japan

Internet Cafe Refugees in Japan

Internet cafes have existed in Japan for over a decade, but in the mid 2000’s, customers began using these spaces as living quarters. Internet cafe refugees are mostly temporary employees; their salary too low to rent their own apartments.

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Post-Apocalyptic Budapest After Ice Fog

The capital of Hungary after ice fog. budapesht budapesht2 budapesht3 budapesht4 budapesht5 budapesht6 budapesht7 budapesht8 budapesht9 budapesht10 budapesht11 budapesht12 budapesht13 budapesht14 budapesht15 budapesht16 budapesht17 budapesht18 budapesht19
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Tuesday, March 10, 2015

Spring vs Winter

Spring vs Winter
Spring road. Andrew Nuding.

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Tuesday, February 24, 2015

A Sunset on Mars & Earth



Mars receives 57% less sunlight than Earth.

Mars


Earth
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Satellite Tracks Saharan Dust to Amazon in 3D



For the first time, a NASA satellite has quantified in three dimensions how much dust makes the trans-Atlantic journey from the Sahara Desert to the Amazon rainforest. Among this dust is phosphorus, an essential nutrient that acts like a fertilizer, which the Amazon depends on in order to flourish.

The new dust transport estimates were derived from data collected by a lidar instrument on NASA's Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation, or CALIPSO, satellite from 2007 though 2013.

An average of 27.7 million tons of dust per year – enough to fill 104,980 semi trucks – fall to the surface over the Amazon basin. The phosphorus portion, an estimated 22,000 tons per year, is about the same amount as that lost from rain and flooding. The finding is part of a bigger research effort to understand the role of dust and aerosols in the environment and on local and global climate.

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