In this map, the orange places are those that face the highest pressure from humans. The blue areas face the least pressure.
In this map, the orange places are those that face the highest pressure from humans. The blue areas face the least pressure.

This map shows where humans' impact on the environment increased or decreased from 1993 to 2009.
This map shows where humans' impact on the environment increased or decreased from 1993 to 2009.


- In 1993, just 27 percent of the land had no measurable human footprint. By 2009, that had grown by 9.3 percent, or 23 million square kilometers.

- While population increased by 23 percent, the average score for the human footprint increased by just 9 percent.

- During that same 16-year period, the global economy has grown 153 percent, 16 times the rate of footprint growth.

- The footprint more than doubled in areas such as the New Guinea mangroves and the Purus Varzea rain forest in the Amazon, and it jumped more than 1,000 percent in the Baffin coastal tundra. The Torngat Mountain tundra saw an increase of more than 10,000 percent.


Via nationalgeographic.com


Related posts:
Ecological footprint
The ecological wealth of nations
Share on Google Plus

Alex E

Ecoclimax is defined by Odum (1969) as the culmination state after a succession in a stabilized ecosystem in which maximum biomass (or high information content) and symbiotic function among organisms is kept per unit of available energy flow.