Restoring fish habitat in the Sandy River Basin

Restoring fish habitat in the Sandy River Basin

The Sandy River Basin is one of many watersheds in the Pacific Northwest that is experiencing the adverse effects of climate change and human impacts. The quality and 1 availability of fish habitat are rapidly declining as the miles of degraded and polluted streams continue to rise. Of the fish species living in the basin, Chinook Salmon, Coho Salmon, and Steelhead are listed under the Endangered Species Act as threatened at the federal level, and Coho Salmon are endangered in Oregon. A majority of streams that provide suitable habitat for these fish are listed as impaired for at least one water quality standard under section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act. Restoration efforts aim to improve the overall health and function of these streams and are often targeted to improve the habitat for specific fish species. In order to assess if the location and type of restoration activities are appropriately applied, it is important to compare the restoration projects to the distribution of threatened fish species and impaired streams.
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Alex E

Ecoclimax is defined by Odum (1969) as the culmination state after a succession in a stabilized ecosystem in which maximum biomass (or high information content) and symbiotic function among organisms is kept per unit of available energy flow.