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U.S. map after global warming

CSIRO-Mk3.0 (The Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research)

Model CSIRO Mk3 developed at CSIRO Atmospheric Research. The CSIRO Mk3 climate system model contains a comprehensive representation of the four major components of the climate system (land surface, atmosphere, oceans and sea-ice), and in its current form is as comprehensive as any of the global coupled models available worldwide.

The forerunners to this model (the Mk1 and Mk2 models) have been used in a large number of climate related experiments, and for multi-seasonal predictions. The major aim in the development of the Mk3 climate model has been to provide a coupled atmosphere-ocean system that gives a significantly improved representation of the current climate relative to the prior model generations. It was also highly desirable that this be achieved without the need for any artificial corrections (the so called “flux adjustments”) to the flux quantities connecting the atmospheric and oceanic systems. This has been successfully achieved with the Mk3 climate system model. The Mk3 model will be used to investigate the dynamical and physical processes controlling the climate system, for multiseasonal predictions, and for investigations of natural climatic variability and climatic change.

The Mk3 model contains an atmospheric model dynamical core that has been developed entirely in-house. The same applies to the landsurface (vegetation canopy) model and sea-ice model. There are a great number of physical processes that have to be incorporated (detailed in this report), and one significant development in the Mk3 model is the inclusion of a new prognostic cloud scheme. This allows the model to generate its own physically-based cloud properties, based upon cloud water and cloud ice. The cloud scheme has been coupled to an atmospheric convection scheme that is derived from that used in the Hadley Centre model. The oceanic model is based upon the GFDL MOM2 code, which has been specifically configured and developed to match the resolution of the atmospheric model. This approach was adopted so as to avoid the added complication of a “flux coupler” (which would be necessary with non-matching ocean-atmospheric grids). The ocean model also includes several important improvements to its physical parameterizations. The Mk3 coupled model has recently been used in a control run, and some details about the coupled model climatology are included.

A1 scenario family
The A1 scenario family describes a future world of very rapid economic growth, global population that peaks in mid-century and declines thereafter, and the rapid introduction of new and more efficient technologies. Major underlying themes are convergence among regions, capacity building and increased cultural and social interactions, with a substantial reduction in regional differences in per capita income. The A1 scenario family develops into three groups that describe alternative directions of technological change in the energy system. The three A1 groups are distinguished by their technological emphasis: fossil intensive (A1FI), non-fossil energy sources (A1T), or a balance across all sources (A1B).
Global warming A1B scenario

Af - Tropical rainforest climate, Am - Tropical monsoon climate,Aw - Tropical savanna climate, BSh - Hot semi-arid climates, BSk - Cold semi-arid climates, BWh - Hot desert climates, BWk - Cold desert climates, Cfa - Humid subtropical climate, Cfb - Oceanic climate, Cfc - Subpolar oceanic climate, Csa - Hot-summer Mediterranean climate, Csb - Warm-summer Mediterranean climate, Cwa - Humid subtropical climate, Cwb - Subtropical highland oceanic climate, Dfa - Hot humid continental climate, Dfb - Warm humid continental climate, Dfc - Subarctic climate, Dfd - Subarctic climate, Dsa - Hot humid continental climate, Dsb - Warm humid continental climate, Dsc - Subarctic climate, Dwa - Humid continental climate, Dwb - Warm humid continental climate, Dwc - Subarctic climate, ET - Tundra climate.
Global warming A1B scenario


Global warming A1B scenario: 2030

Global warming A1B scenario: 2050

Global warming A1B scenario: 2070

Global warming A1B scenario: 2080

Global warming A1B scenario: 2090

Global warming A1B scenario: 2100

A2 scenario family
The A2 family describes a very heterogeneous world. The underlying theme is self-reliance and preservation of local identities. Fertility patterns across regions converge very slowly, which results in continuously increasing population. Economic development is primarily regionally oriented and per capita economic growth and technological change more fragmented and slower than other storylines.
Global warming A2 scenario
Af - Tropical rainforest climate, Am - Tropical monsoon climate,Aw - Tropical savanna climate, BSh - Hot semi-arid climates, BSk - Cold semi-arid climates, BWh - Hot desert climates, BWk - Cold desert climates, Cfa - Humid subtropical climate, Cfb - Oceanic climate, Cfc - Subpolar oceanic climate, Csa - Hot-summer Mediterranean climate, Csb - Warm-summer Mediterranean climate, Cwa - Humid subtropical climate, Cwb - Subtropical highland oceanic climate, Dfa - Hot humid continental climate, Dfb - Warm humid continental climate, Dfc - Subarctic climate, Dfd - Subarctic climate, Dsa - Hot humid continental climate, Dsb - Warm humid continental climate, Dsc - Subarctic climate, Dwa - Humid continental climate, Dwb - Warm humid continental climate, Dwc - Subarctic climate, ET - Tundra climate.

Global warming A2 scenario: 2030

Global warming A2 scenario: 2050

Global warming A2 scenario: 2070

Global warming A2 scenario: 2080

Global warming A2 scenario: 2090

Global warming A2 scenario: 2100
MIROC-H (Center for Climate Research, Japan)

The Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate (MIROC), which is the coupled general circulation model used in the K-1 project, consists of five componet models: atmosphere, land, river, sea ice, and ocean. The atmospheric component interacts with the land and sea ice components. The air-sea exchange is realized exclusively between the atmosphere and sea ice components, not directly between the atmosphere and ocean components, and the ocean component interacts only with the sea ice component. That is, air-sea flux at ice-free grids is consequently passed to the ocean component without modification, but it is first passed to the sea ice component. The river component receives ground runoff water from the land component and drains riverine runoff water into the sea ice component. Lakes are dealt with by the sea ice and ocean components.

A1B scenario
US: Model MIROC-H, A1B scenario
Af - Tropical rainforest climate, Am - Tropical monsoon climate,Aw - Tropical savanna climate, BSh - Hot semi-arid climates, BSk - Cold semi-arid climates, BWh - Hot desert climates, BWk - Cold desert climates, Cfa - Humid subtropical climate, Cfb - Oceanic climate, Cfc - Subpolar oceanic climate, Csa - Hot-summer Mediterranean climate, Csb - Warm-summer Mediterranean climate, Cwa - Humid subtropical climate, Cwb - Subtropical highland oceanic climate, Dfa - Hot humid continental climate, Dfb - Warm humid continental climate, Dfc - Subarctic climate, Dfd - Subarctic climate, Dsa - Hot humid continental climate, Dsb - Warm humid continental climate, Dsc - Subarctic climate, Dwa - Humid continental climate, Dwb - Warm humid continental climate, Dwc - Subarctic climate, ET - Tundra climate.
United State Climates
United Stites: Model MIROC-H, A1B scenario 2030

United Stites: Model MIROC-H, A1B scenario 2050

United Stites: Model MIROC-H, A1B scenario 2070

United Stites: Model MIROC-H, A1B scenario 2080

United Stites: Model MIROC-H, A1B scenario 2090

United Stites: Model MIROC-H, A1B scenario 2100

A2 scenario
United Stites Climate Change: Model MIROC-H, A2 scenario
Af - Tropical rainforest climate, Am - Tropical monsoon climate,Aw - Tropical savanna climate, BSh - Hot semi-arid climates, BSk - Cold semi-arid climates, BWh - Hot desert climates, BWk - Cold desert climates, Cfa - Humid subtropical climate, Cfb - Oceanic climate, Cfc - Subpolar oceanic climate, Csa - Hot-summer Mediterranean climate, Csb - Warm-summer Mediterranean climate, Cwa - Humid subtropical climate, Cwb - Subtropical highland oceanic climate, Dfa - Hot humid continental climate, Dfb - Warm humid continental climate, Dfc - Subarctic climate, Dfd - Subarctic climate, Dsa - Hot humid continental climate, Dsb - Warm humid continental climate, Dsc - Subarctic climate, Dwa - Humid continental climate, Dwb - Warm humid continental climate, Dwc - Subarctic climate, ET - Tundra climate.


United Stites Climate Change: Model MIROC-H, A2 scenario, 2030

United Stites Climate Change: Model MIROC-H, A2 scenario, 2050

United Stites Climate Change: Model MIROC-H, A2 scenario, 2070

United Stites Climate Change: Model MIROC-H, A2 scenario, 2080

United Stites Climate Change: Model MIROC-H, A2 scenario, 2090

United Stites Climate Change: Model MIROC-H, A2 scenario, 2100
Via www.ecoclimax.com & www.ipcc.ch & www.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Related post:
Köppen climate classification (1981 - 2100)

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