Diving the Depths

Pearl Diver (Free Dive)
Pearl divers of the central Tuamotu Archipelago in French Polynesia dive without extemal air supply. They can dive to depths of more than 39 meters where they collect oysters for up to two minutes.

Emperor Penguin
Emperor penguins dive deeper than any other bird. They hold their breath when they dive and how long they hold their breath depends on how deep they dive and how fast they move.

SCUBA Diver (Aided Dive)
In June 2005 Nuno Gomes set the World's Deepest Open Circuit SCUBA record; independently verified by Guinness World Records. It took Gomes about 20 minutes to reach 318.25 m, and 12 hours to surface.

Bottlenose Dolphin
Bottlenose dolphins usually do not need to dive deep to catch their food however they are capable of diving. Under experimental conditions, one bottlenose dolphin dove to 535 meters.

Beluga Whale
Beluga whales are able to swim both forward and backwards (something few other whales can do). Under experimental conditions a trained beluga whale dove to a depth of 647 meters.

Southern Elephant Seal
Southern elephant seals live in sub-Antarctic and Antarctic waters and are the largest of all seals. The deepest dive recorded by an Elephant Seal is 2388 meters.

Sperm Whale
Sperm Whales are one of the deepest-diving mammals in the world. They dive in search of squid to eat and are believed to be able to dive up to 3000 meters in depth to the ocean floor.

See alsow:
- Guillaume Nery base jumping at Dean's Blue Hole
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Alex E

Ecoclimax is defined by Odum (1969) as the culmination state after a succession in a stabilized ecosystem in which maximum biomass (or high information content) and symbiotic function among organisms is kept per unit of available energy flow.